A super fast, but also risky, way to become a digital nomad is to simply buy an existing Online Business that already generates money or, even better, a passive income. You can buy businesses on sites like Flippa.com. You’re able to see how much money the site already generates and its monetization strategies. This would generate enough income to get started as a digital nomad.
You might think that the best route to becoming a digital nomad is by taking the entrepreneurial road and starting your own online business. This will undoubtedly give you the most freedom but it’s very difficult to succeed – especially if you have don’t have a lot of experience. And in fact most digital nomads don’t start out like this, instead they get started with remote work or freelancing. This means they are getting paid to gain more experience and skills. Plus it’s usually quite quick and easy.
The characteristic that all digital nomads have in common is that they usually spend several months abroad each year, are constantly on the move, and earn an income while working online. A digital nomad can easily make an income of $12,000 per year and live a nice, cushy lifestyle in countries like Thailand or Bali in South East Asia. Take that same digital nomad to London, Paris, or Sydney, and that’s not going to work out so well. Location independence means nomads have true freedom thanks to healthy incomes that allow them to run their business from any city on the planet, even from the most expensive ones.

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Passive income, by far, is the most important financial tool that will afford you the freedom to not only receive income automatically, every single month, without fail, but it'll also give you the means to have a flexible schedule to spend time with your family and children or wander the world as a digital nomad, choosing to work when you please, on your own schedule.

Virtually anyone can attempt to live the digital nomad life, though certain groups are more representative in the community. These groups include younger people, entrepreneurs, refugees, nomads overall, people from well to do nations, and more.[22] Digital nomads have been said to be inspired by Tim Ferriss' The 4-Hour Workweek, David Allen's Getting Things Done methodology, and the work of Mark Manson.[23][24]
When asked for one piece of advice she would give to new nomads, Location Indie member Rachel Story of GratefulGypsies.com said, “Get organized and have a to-do list! Make a plan! As repulsive as a ‘routine’ may seem, it’s essential for getting sh*t done. The good part is that you can choose your own routine. Want to go for a run mid-morning, no worries! Take a long lunch to catch up with a friend? Do it! You’re still ticking things off your list!”
Paying for things that don’t greatly impact your life is never ideal. That’s why you need to get rid of all the expenses that you won’t need living as a digital nomad. Things like gym memberships, subscriptions, and debt are all expenses that’ll bog you down on the road. And if you’re a freelancer, they’ll be even more of a burden because you might experience some periods of inconsistent income. Getting rid of these expenses and paying off debt will allow you to fully focus on your work and travels.

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More website traffic is always a good thing. And most online marketing strategies do revolve around building traffic to your site. Yet it’s sometimes challenging to come up with new ideas to boost your site’s traffic. That’s why I’ve come up with this list of 50 easy strategies to try, to increase your website traffic so you'll never run out of ideas.

Mentioning brands, articles, and related influencers within a piece is always a great opportunity to distribute content. When I publish a post, I aim to have between 10 and 20 links in the piece, from pull quotes to mentions. When I post, boom, I have 10 to 20 people to email to let them know I featured them. I’ll ask them to share the piece with their followers on Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn.

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Spend a few hours and learn the Korean alphabet (not that hard) and Google some names of Korean dishes + it's spelling in Korean. It will help a lot as most restaurants only have Korean menu's and often without pictures. As mentioned previously on the reviews, it's a little hard to eat alone, but Gimbab Chonguk (김밥천국) is everywhere and 24/7 - no one will bat an eye. Also look for places that "specialises" in dumplings, They are usually "alone-eating" friendly. And so are ramen places as well as Korean "chinese" restaurants - Jajangmyeon (자장면) is very good and super addictive. Bibimbab restaurant places are fine too. Actually, it's not that hard to eat alone in Korea. The "group" meals are generally quite obvious and will be things like BBQ. You'll figure it out. Do Get used to kimchi and spicy food otherwise you'll end up eating the same thing all the time. Be adventurous. Challenge yourself and eat an octopus alive (산낙지). If you're really brave try 보신탕 before authorities close them all - I haven't but a lot of Weagukins (foreigners) secret do. Cafe's generally have really good wifi, as you would expect from one of the most connected countries in the world. Expect to pay $4-6 for a latte and maybe even more at Starbucks. Best cafe's are usually around Hipster areas and Universities. Indie owned cafe's are awesome. Nightlife is great, probably amongst the best in Asia. Can get very expensive especially at night clubs in Gangnam where it would could be like $10 for a beer - in that case you can still get drunk for $2 with soju just outside at 7Eleven. Winters are stupidly cold and summers can be brutally hot & humid. Go between April and June or September to October. They have cherry blossoms in spring which is beautiful and so are the autumn leaves. Lived here for many years. It's a cool place and vastly underrated. Seoul is continuously becoming more expensive and cost of living will soon be comparable with places like Tokyo.
Whether you're looking to emulate from the success of Kepnes, or you're simply looking to set out for an extended stay to see how you enjoy living as a digital nomad, there are 5 distinct steps that you need to take before embarking upon your journey. The more attention you pay to the details before you leave, the less headache you'll have overall in your experience of the nomadic lifestyle.
Because your site likely has a really low score, you’ll want to start targeting relevant keywords and phrases—but don’t go for the big ones like “business ideas” because you’ll have an incredibly hard time ranking for those top-level keyword phrases. Instead, aim for long-tail keyword phrases, like “monthly web hosting plans” and you'll have a better chance at ranking—fun fact: that’s a real example of a long-tail keyword I use for my blog. 

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