Reddit is a little tricky, because if you are overtly self-promotional the readers will pick up on it immediately and “downvote you to oblivion,” as they say. However, that doesn’t mean you can’t have success there. Put connecting with the community and building a rapport with dedicated commenters first. Then, you can make a post and ask for feedback once you feel comfortable.
I spent 3 weeks in Belgrade (July 2019) to visit a friend who relocated. To be honest, while i've traveled somewhat extensively, and leave the USA on average three times per year, I had no idea what to expect in Serbia (Belgrade). I'd never been to Eastern Europe, let alone the Balkans. Overall, I was pleasantly surprised at how incredibly friendly just about everyone was. Everyone spoke english everywhere I went: cafes, restaurants, supermarket, taxis, shops, etc. My friend has very small children, and Belgrade is FULL of parks. The parks are routinely teeming with parents, as it seems there's some sort of a baby boom going on there. I was able to easily strike up friendly conversation with locals, who were extremely cordial. Even though I was there to visit friends, I spent the majority of my time alone exploring. I stayed in the city center, close to Republic Square. From there I could walk just about anywhere; the river, the mall on the other side of the river, waterfront, the old fort, etc. Taxis were extremely cheap, but often I just preferred to walk, even to Vracar from where I was in Venac , which is about a 30 minute walk, just because it was nice to experience Belgrade and people watch along the way. The AirBnb I rented had a functioning kitchen, and food in the supermarket is pretty cheap, but so is eating out (by American standards). I routinely had lunch or dinner with a drink, coffee and desert for anywhere from $11-18USD on average. I chose mostly to sit at any one of the countless open air cafe/restaurants twice a day, because it was so worth it. Is Belgrade the most exciting place on the planet? Probably not. At the same time, it's not boring either. I ended up loving the place. Between the people, the fact that I felt completely safe walking around by myself past midnight on many occasions, the great food, and typically European feel, I would definitely recommend Belgrade. Especially if you're not on a London/Paris budget, but want to experience Europe. People are much nicer also.

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Keep in mind that plans shouldn’t only revolve around your income as a remote worker. You also want to address everyday aspects of healthy living such as healthcare, insurance and local laws and regulations. Since you’ll be living in foreign countries, you’ll need to do some research to make sure you understand any new rules and ensure you have the right support if you get sick or injured while exploring.

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When you live abroad, It’s crucial to have multiple backup plans in case of any emergencies. Nothing really ever works out the way it’s supposed to. Things happen. What if your truck breaks down? Or what if you get stuck in a foreign country with no backup plan? What’s your plan B and C? You need to set these processes in place to handle the inevitable bumps in the road.

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So let’s say I go and look up one of my sales letters in the health niche and it’s like how to lose 20 pounds in 30 days. I take that headline, I take out the parts about it that our health-related and I try to rewrite it for real estate. And this can create some fun play-on-words and help you think about ways to say things that you might not have said in the first place.

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You aren’t going to get very far if you don’t know who your readers are and you’re not making an effort to communicate with them on a more personal level. Setting up a sign-up in your posts and on your site for a newsletter is one of the most powerful ways to keep your readers excited about the work you’re doing. Consider using a tool to manage your lists as well, like ConvertKit.
No, Matt Kepnes, aka Nomadic Matt, wasn't living off passive income when he set off on a one-year journey that morphed into an 18-month trek in faraway lands. However, upon his return in 2008, and two weeks after the warm glow of being back home in Boston had worn off, he realized that traveling was his passion and that being back home wasn't all that it was cracked up to be.

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Do you love your job but spend most of your time on the laptop so your presence in the office is hardly ever required? Who knows, if you have an understanding boss you might be able to convince him or her to give you more freedom and allow you to do most of your work remotely. Don’t tell them that you want to work from abroad at the beginning, instead prove that you can do your job remotely from home before taking the next step. Yes it’s true you might be able to become digital nomad without quitting your job. You don’t know if you don’t ask!
Now is also the time to pay down or set up payment plans for any debts you may have. Credit card debt should be eliminated as soon as possible because of the high interest rates. If you have student loan debt, you can set up a payment plan or open a special account for your payments so you don’t have to stress if you start digging into savings when you’re travelling. If you have a car, think about selling it.  Remember, you won’t be using it in the long term, and you’ll also save more money in the short term by not having to pay for gas, maintenance, registration or insurance.

Justin and his wife have been living, working, and traveling across America in a Ford F-250 with an Airstream trailer hitched to its back for the past two years. And their alternative lifestyle has helped them prioritize life experiences and close connections over material possessions. They’re modern day nomads. Or what most people call digital nomads.

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