I think airfare and other travel expenses will cost me around 3k total if I buy now so that leaves me with 12k to stretch over 11 months. I would prefer to stay in the same location as long as possible as to limit traveling expenses and keep my focus on web development. My hope is that by the end of 2020 I will have built an online presence that will allow me to sustain this lifestyle. Or maybe I will have developed either my coding or graphic design skills enough to land a remote job and continue traveling. At the very least hopefully I will have enough skills to get a job back in the US and return to the rat race.

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Because we were optimistic today. So you need to try to figure out how to get your cost per click down. Okay. So maybe it’s with content, maybe with social strategy, maybe with better ad targeting. But let’s say you can get it down to thirty cents a click, right? So thirty cents, it’s twenty cents less. That doesn’t seem like that much. But guess what happens now it’s only costing you $1,500 to get those 5,000 views on that page.
Traveling can give you some of the best experiences in your life, but it not always a blissful, perpetual highlight reel. It’s still real life. You’ll get sick, have emergencies and accidents, and need regular checkups. You also need immunizations to enter certain parts of the world. Your health should be your number one priority during your travels, so make sure you buy a solid health insurance plan that’s valid in all the places you visit.
Of course, implementing this isn't easy. You need to first develop your stories, then decide on how you're going to convey those stories and at what drip-rate. For example, your first email or two might go out on the day they first signup, then one email per day might go out afterwards. How much of that will be story-based and how much will be pitches?

Spend a few hours and learn the Korean alphabet (not that hard) and Google some names of Korean dishes + it's spelling in Korean. It will help a lot as most restaurants only have Korean menu's and often without pictures. As mentioned previously on the reviews, it's a little hard to eat alone, but Gimbab Chonguk (김밥천국) is everywhere and 24/7 - no one will bat an eye. Also look for places that "specialises" in dumplings, They are usually "alone-eating" friendly. And so are ramen places as well as Korean "chinese" restaurants - Jajangmyeon (자장면) is very good and super addictive. Bibimbab restaurant places are fine too. Actually, it's not that hard to eat alone in Korea. The "group" meals are generally quite obvious and will be things like BBQ. You'll figure it out. Do Get used to kimchi and spicy food otherwise you'll end up eating the same thing all the time. Be adventurous. Challenge yourself and eat an octopus alive (산낙지). If you're really brave try 보신탕 before authorities close them all - I haven't but a lot of Weagukins (foreigners) secret do. Cafe's generally have really good wifi, as you would expect from one of the most connected countries in the world. Expect to pay $4-6 for a latte and maybe even more at Starbucks. Best cafe's are usually around Hipster areas and Universities. Indie owned cafe's are awesome. Nightlife is great, probably amongst the best in Asia. Can get very expensive especially at night clubs in Gangnam where it would could be like $10 for a beer - in that case you can still get drunk for $2 with soju just outside at 7Eleven. Winters are stupidly cold and summers can be brutally hot & humid. Go between April and June or September to October. They have cherry blossoms in spring which is beautiful and so are the autumn leaves. Lived here for many years. It's a cool place and vastly underrated. Seoul is continuously becoming more expensive and cost of living will soon be comparable with places like Tokyo.

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A business finds itself in need of a part-time job/freelancer. They post the job description, time allocation and budget on to the job board. From there, freelancers from around the world who have a profile with these sites, will see the ad on their job board and choose whether or not to apply for the work. If the applicants apply they will then get in touch with the business through the particular website with their portfolio and a cover letter motivating why they are a good fit for the job. After reviewing the freelancer’s cover letter and portfolio, the business will decide if they agree they are the right fit and then they move on to complete the brief and work as any freelancer and client would. Usually, these websites take a slight percentage commission of the agreed upon rate for the work, and everyone is happy. It’s that simple.

A business finds itself in need of a part-time job/freelancer. They post the job description, time allocation and budget on to the job board. From there, freelancers from around the world who have a profile with these sites, will see the ad on their job board and choose whether or not to apply for the work. If the applicants apply they will then get in touch with the business through the particular website with their portfolio and a cover letter motivating why they are a good fit for the job. After reviewing the freelancer’s cover letter and portfolio, the business will decide if they agree they are the right fit and then they move on to complete the brief and work as any freelancer and client would. Usually, these websites take a slight percentage commission of the agreed upon rate for the work, and everyone is happy. It’s that simple.

Passive income, by far, is the most important financial tool that will afford you the freedom to not only receive income automatically, every single month, without fail, but it'll also give you the means to have a flexible schedule to spend time with your family and children or wander the world as a digital nomad, choosing to work when you please, on your own schedule.

What is funnel software


Brian, I recently found your blog by following OKDork.com. Just want to say you’re really amazing with the content you put out here. It’s so helpful, especially for someone like me who is just starting out. I’m currently writing posts for a blog I plan to launch later this year. I think my niche is a little too broad and I have to figure out how to narrow it down. I essentially want to write about my current journey of overcoming my fears to start accomplishing the dreams i have for blogging, business, and travel. In doing so, I will share the best tips, tools, and tactics I can find, as well as what worked, what didn’t and why.
Practicing SEO now for over a decade, I don’t often come across many blog posts on the subject that introduce me to anything new — especially when it comes to link building. However, I must admit, after reading your article here I had to bookmark it to refer back to it in the future, as I’m sure it will come in handy when doing SEO for my websites later on down the road.

When I’m doing research for a piece I’m going to write, I’ll send emails out to influencers who are authorities in the area I’m writing about. I’ll ask them for a quote to include in the blog post, and ask them a single question – this is how I do it, if you’re interested. I don’t worry too much about non-responses or rejections, because as long as a few of them write back, I’ve got a solid contribution for my post. Because they’re authority figures, it not only lends the piece credibility, but if they happen to share the post, I’ll get exposure to their audience as well.


More website traffic is always a good thing. And most online marketing strategies do revolve around building traffic to your site. Yet it’s sometimes challenging to come up with new ideas to boost your site’s traffic. That’s why I’ve come up with this list of 50 easy strategies to try, to increase your website traffic so you'll never run out of ideas.

Great article. My site has been up for several years now but I rebranded and switched from Blogger to WordPress about a year ago because I was told the reason why my traffic is so low is because I was using the wrong platform. I still haven’t seen an increase in my traffic and am very frustrated. I write in the health, fitness and parenting niche and I have over 30 experts that write for me, but I still don’t have the page views I would like. My paychecks are small and I am very frustrated. How do I find out what influencers in my niche are talking about and what they would like to share? I read tons of blogs, but most of them just review products or write about their kids, not a whole lot of similar articles. Where do I begin to find sharable content in my niche?

What is an online funnel


Awesome tips Brian. Always enjoy your posts. My question is, how can I boost traffic significantly if my keyword has pretty low search volume (around 100 monthly searches based on keyword planner)? I’ve been trying to expand my keyword list to include broader terms like “customer experience” but as you know that is super competitive. Do you have any suggestions for me? Thanks in advance.
When you live abroad, It’s crucial to have multiple backup plans in case of any emergencies. Nothing really ever works out the way it’s supposed to. Things happen. What if your truck breaks down? Or what if you get stuck in a foreign country with no backup plan? What’s your plan B and C? You need to set these processes in place to handle the inevitable bumps in the road.

What is full funnel marketing


However, it isn't just about passive income. There are definitely digital nomads that live on an active income. If travel is what you're after, and you're interested in living, working and immersing yourself in another culture far away from home, you could do it on an active income. It involves jumping through more hoops and flying by the proverbial seat of your pants, but you can do it.

How do I get free traffic to my blog


Think interviews are only for the big leaguers? You’d be amazed how many people will be willing to talk to you if you just ask them. Send out emails requesting an interview to thought leaders in your industry, and publish the interviews on your blog. Not only will the name recognition boost your credibility and increase traffic to your website, the interviewee will probably share the content too, further expanding its reach.

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Yep and sometimes it’s just being a little creative. I’ve started a little blog on seo/wordpress just for fun actually… no great content on it like here though… but because the competition is so tough in these niches I decided to take another approach. I created a few WordPress plugins that users can download for free from wordpress.org… and of course these link to my site so this gets me visitors each day.

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Once you’ve figured out what skills you have that will enable you to work remotely, you need to find a job. Arguably the easiest way to do this is to scour remote specific job sites. Luckily, there are now tons of sites online like We Work Remotely and RemoteOk that post only jobs that are remote or location independent. Check out UpWork, formerly known as ODesk, to find freelance gigs for everything from virtual assistants and photographers to accountants and consultants.

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Because we were optimistic today. So you need to try to figure out how to get your cost per click down. Okay. So maybe it’s with content, maybe with social strategy, maybe with better ad targeting. But let’s say you can get it down to thirty cents a click, right? So thirty cents, it’s twenty cents less. That doesn’t seem like that much. But guess what happens now it’s only costing you $1,500 to get those 5,000 views on that page.

You aren’t going to get very far if you don’t know who your readers are and you’re not making an effort to communicate with them on a more personal level. Setting up a sign-up in your posts and on your site for a newsletter is one of the most powerful ways to keep your readers excited about the work you’re doing. Consider using a tool to manage your lists as well, like ConvertKit.

How can I make my website more appealing


Spend a few hours and learn the Korean alphabet (not that hard) and Google some names of Korean dishes + it's spelling in Korean. It will help a lot as most restaurants only have Korean menu's and often without pictures. As mentioned previously on the reviews, it's a little hard to eat alone, but Gimbab Chonguk (김밥천국) is everywhere and 24/7 - no one will bat an eye. Also look for places that "specialises" in dumplings, They are usually "alone-eating" friendly. And so are ramen places as well as Korean "chinese" restaurants - Jajangmyeon (자장면) is very good and super addictive. Bibimbab restaurant places are fine too. Actually, it's not that hard to eat alone in Korea. The "group" meals are generally quite obvious and will be things like BBQ. You'll figure it out. Do Get used to kimchi and spicy food otherwise you'll end up eating the same thing all the time. Be adventurous. Challenge yourself and eat an octopus alive (산낙지). If you're really brave try 보신탕 before authorities close them all - I haven't but a lot of Weagukins (foreigners) secret do. Cafe's generally have really good wifi, as you would expect from one of the most connected countries in the world. Expect to pay $4-6 for a latte and maybe even more at Starbucks. Best cafe's are usually around Hipster areas and Universities. Indie owned cafe's are awesome. Nightlife is great, probably amongst the best in Asia. Can get very expensive especially at night clubs in Gangnam where it would could be like $10 for a beer - in that case you can still get drunk for $2 with soju just outside at 7Eleven. Winters are stupidly cold and summers can be brutally hot & humid. Go between April and June or September to October. They have cherry blossoms in spring which is beautiful and so are the autumn leaves. Lived here for many years. It's a cool place and vastly underrated. Seoul is continuously becoming more expensive and cost of living will soon be comparable with places like Tokyo.
However, it isn't just about passive income. There are definitely digital nomads that live on an active income. If travel is what you're after, and you're interested in living, working and immersing yourself in another culture far away from home, you could do it on an active income. It involves jumping through more hoops and flying by the proverbial seat of your pants, but you can do it.

How do I get free traffic to my blog


I spent 3 weeks in Belgrade (July 2019) to visit a friend who relocated. To be honest, while i've traveled somewhat extensively, and leave the USA on average three times per year, I had no idea what to expect in Serbia (Belgrade). I'd never been to Eastern Europe, let alone the Balkans. Overall, I was pleasantly surprised at how incredibly friendly just about everyone was. Everyone spoke english everywhere I went: cafes, restaurants, supermarket, taxis, shops, etc. My friend has very small children, and Belgrade is FULL of parks. The parks are routinely teeming with parents, as it seems there's some sort of a baby boom going on there. I was able to easily strike up friendly conversation with locals, who were extremely cordial. Even though I was there to visit friends, I spent the majority of my time alone exploring. I stayed in the city center, close to Republic Square. From there I could walk just about anywhere; the river, the mall on the other side of the river, waterfront, the old fort, etc. Taxis were extremely cheap, but often I just preferred to walk, even to Vracar from where I was in Venac , which is about a 30 minute walk, just because it was nice to experience Belgrade and people watch along the way. The AirBnb I rented had a functioning kitchen, and food in the supermarket is pretty cheap, but so is eating out (by American standards). I routinely had lunch or dinner with a drink, coffee and desert for anywhere from $11-18USD on average. I chose mostly to sit at any one of the countless open air cafe/restaurants twice a day, because it was so worth it. Is Belgrade the most exciting place on the planet? Probably not. At the same time, it's not boring either. I ended up loving the place. Between the people, the fact that I felt completely safe walking around by myself past midnight on many occasions, the great food, and typically European feel, I would definitely recommend Belgrade. Especially if you're not on a London/Paris budget, but want to experience Europe. People are much nicer also.

How do I promote my new website


Your income: Where's your money going to come from while traveling? What happens if you can't find work to help you meet your obligations. Or, what if you get stuck in a foreign country somewhere with no backup income? Then what? Sure, most digital nomads might throw caution to the wind. But, you'll want to be prepared. You need to handle your income in order to get there.

How many words should be on a Web page for SEO


Great article. My site has been up for several years now but I rebranded and switched from Blogger to WordPress about a year ago because I was told the reason why my traffic is so low is because I was using the wrong platform. I still haven’t seen an increase in my traffic and am very frustrated. I write in the health, fitness and parenting niche and I have over 30 experts that write for me, but I still don’t have the page views I would like. My paychecks are small and I am very frustrated. How do I find out what influencers in my niche are talking about and what they would like to share? I read tons of blogs, but most of them just review products or write about their kids, not a whole lot of similar articles. Where do I begin to find sharable content in my niche?

What is an online funnel


If where you live is so expensive that most of your salary goes towards maintaining your fixed costs, you might consider reducing them and saving up some money so you can move to a digital nomad hub like Chiang Mai in Thailand where your money goes a lot further. Here it will be a lot easier to learn all the skills that you’re going to need to work online because you’ll be surrounded by other digital nomads. You could even rent out your apartment at home and make some passive income that way.

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